Log in

News

  • 31 Mar 2021 6:40 AM | Rick Lakin, Webmaster (Administrator)

    Virtual Event Series

    The San Diego Union-Tribune Festival of Books virtual event series is back! This Thursday, April 1 at 12:30 p.m. PDT, we are kicking off the first virtual live Q&A with No. 1 New York Times bestselling author Marie Lu on the Union-Tribune Facebook. Abby Hamblin, the Union-Tribune opinion editor, will moderate.

    Marie Lu's Skyhunter
    Marie Lu

    Marie Lu is the No. 1 New York Times bestselling author of the Legend series, the Young Elites trilogy, “Batman: Nightwalker,” the Warcross series, “The Kingdom of Back” and “Skyhunter.” She graduated from the University of Southern California and jumped into the video game industry as an artist. Now a full-time writer, Lu lives in Los Angeles with her illustrator/author husband, Primo Gallanosa, and their son.

    Purchase “Skyhunter” on bookshop.org.

    Upcoming Virtual Events 

     

    April 8 at  11 a.m. PDT – Children’s storytime with Mayor Todd Gloria

    April 15 at 12:30 p.m. PDT – Author Q&A with Joe Kenda

    April 22 at 11 a.m. PDT – Children’s storytime with Gulliver of the San Diego Gulls

    April 29 at 12:30 p.m. PDT – Author Q&A in Spanish with Paola Ramos


    For more info, click here

    SAVE THE DATE FOR OUR FIFTH ANNUAL FESTIVAL OF BOOKS!
    AUGUST 21, 2021

    For more information, visit sdfestivalofbooks.com.


  • 17 Mar 2021 9:50 AM | Rick Lakin, Webmaster (Administrator)


    This is the sixth in a series of posts to address issues I have seen in the work of others with my suggestions for how writers can improve their manuscripts before turning them over to agents, editors, and the many other individuals involved in the process of turning a manuscript into a book.

    #6 ITALICIZING FOREIGN WORDS

    The Chicago Manual of Style recommends italicizing unfamiliar foreign words. But what is unfamliar and foreign to one person may be familiar to another. A standard means to determine the familiarity of a foreign word is whether it appears in Merriam-Webster’s dictionary.

    When I edit the work of others, I use merriam-webster.com to look up all foreign words and place any not appearing there in italics. I do not rely on whether the words are familiar to me.

    The exception—there’s always an exception—to this rule of italicizing unfamiliar foreign words is that foreign proper names are not be italicized.

    In my own work-in-progress, set in Tehran in the mid-1970s, therefore, I have not italicized the names of streets even though the words do not appear in merriam-webster.com. In addition, I found many words I thought would be unfamiliar to readers in merriam-webster.com, likely because more than forty years have passed since I lived there.

    Image credit: Photo by Charles Deluvio on Unsplash

    Sandra YeamanSandra Yeaman retired from the US Department of State in 2007 after 23 years as a Foreign Service Officer. As a management officer, she served at US embassies in Qatar, Barbados, Moldova, the United Arab Emirates, Yemen, Madagascar, Zambia, and Eritrea. In addition, she served in consular positions in Germany and Barbados and previously taught English as a Foreign Language in Iran and Romania.

    She is familiar with Arabic, Farsi, German, Romanian, Russian, and Spanish. Her experiences overseas brought her in touch with underserved minorities and religious groups out of favor with the current government. These experiences provide her with a sensitivity in her writing and editing not easily attained by others.

    These changes in environment and cultures challenged her notion of what success is. What made it possible for her to thrive in the midst of the change is the solid foundation she received in her childhood years in northern Minnesota.

    Since retirement, Sandra has been writing her story and her journey from a young woman seeking adventure to a mature woman who found her mission. She hopes to complete her novel in 2021 and looks forward to gaining the expertise in the full range of pre-publication book preparation and marketing.

    Sandra's Website



  • 14 Mar 2021 12:17 PM | Leon Lazarus (Administrator)


    Dr. Patricia Daly-Lipe
    literarylady.com

    What is creativity? To find out, we can pursue two avenues. On the one hand, we can follow a systematic, methodical mode of rational thought. On the other hand, the search can be approached irrationally or non-logically, a non-linear mode of thought.

    On the rational side, we begin with words. To form a description of creativity, we need a vocabulary. Or do we? Here, the right brain (the non-rational side) kicks in and challenges the left's (or rational side's) attempt at analysis. Is part of the essence of creativity beyond definition? If this is the case, can we think (and thus experience creativity) without words?

    Are language and the naming of things equivalent to thinking? According to Webster, to think means "to have the mind occupied on some subject; to judge; to intend; to imagine, to consider" and "to believe." Can we imagine without imaging something? Can we believe without believing something? Prior to naming things, is man thinking?

    Thinking involves knowing, and what follows is the possibility that knowing does not need an image. Perhaps to know requires that we recognize how much we do not know. To paraphrase St. Thomas: "The more that I know, the more I know how little I know." Etymology or the study of the derivation of words can assist and enhance our search for the origin of thought. The word "recognize," for example, comes from "re" (again) andcognosere (Latin, meaning 'to know'). Thus, if we recognize something, it is because we knew it before. But when did we begin to know? And, therefore, when did we begin to think, since thinking and knowing are mutually supporting? Again, we look at words. How do we "know," understand, and "recognize" (know again) the following words: love, hate, envy? These are words, but they aren't objects; they cannot be visualized. They come from within. These are called emotions. Our primitive ancestors probably anthropomorphized word pictures to express feelings; adjectives came later.

    Metaphor pairs two images thrown into relief but intact, each unto itself. There is a definite psychological mechanism used in the processing of a metaphor. "Metaphor is probably the most fertile power possessed by man," wrote Jose Ortega Gassetin in 1948. For Ortega, life was an intense dialogue between oneself and one's environment. "Things are not me and I am not things: we are mutually transcendent, but both are immanent in thatabsolute coexistence, which is life." (Unas lecciones de metafisica, (1966) "Yo soy yo y mi circumstancia—I am I and my circumstances." Metaphor transcends the obvious and the visual; it translates man's relation to his environment on another level—a "transcendent," unique, or creative level.

    Another linguistic aspect of creativity might be observed in Descartes' definition of the essence of man: "Je pense, donc je suis" (I think; therefore, I am) which occurs in his Discourse on Method (1637). Philosophical thought expresses both the potential and the limitations of human knowledge. It demands that we attempt to think beyond reality.

    But how did man jump from naming names to 'understanding' them, from depicting observed images on the walls of a cave to developing philosophical insight? The answer, I believe, occurred when we became conscious of the difference between us and other; when we understood that we were 'seeing' this or that and we were somehow involved with what was "out there." Could it be that our awareness of ourselves in the world as other than the objects came before words? If so, the words, even the painted images, followed thought. And if this is so, thought comes before words. Man can think without words. I am; therefore, I think. So, the depiction of what we observed and the development of a language to express our relationship with the observed were preceded by something beyond words.

    The root of the word imagination, is image. To imagine something in the mind's eye, we must have seen it in the "outside" world. The object is on the outside; the thought of the object is on the inside. However, the two sides are not separate. Sensations follow the same logic. We can feel/hear/see/smell; there is no hearing without sound, no sense-perception without an object to provoke it. Again, it is a question of the person knowing that he knows, being aware that he is aware. First there is the thought and then there is the thing. The inevitable question follows: If there were no thought of it, would the object not be there? Is an object/sensation a thing unto itself without a person's perception of it? Does thought exist before words?

    Science can contribute facts; however, the philosopher (from Latin, philos, meaning "loving," and Sophos, meaning "wise") in his wide intellectual pursuit knows no boundaries.

    The word 'create' means to bring forth something new as an artistic or intellectual invention. The moment preceding the act of spontaneous creativity has been described many ways. Dancer Isadora Duncan called it a "state of complete suspense." This non-verbal excitement, dreamlike, vague, and ambiguous is also experienced in the other arts: painting, writing, music, and sculpting. Author and poet Stephen Spender expressed it succinctly and pointedly as "a dim cloud of an idea, which I feel must be condensed into a shower of words." In painting, I have often experienced what Cezanne described as "an iridescent chaos" when the painting and I compete for dominance. Paint stroke by paint stroke, the colors sit up on the canvas, and the adventure begins as I attempt to come to an agreement (or image) while the painting seems to have a mind of its own. This sounds like nonsense, but for me it sets in motion my subconscious. Mesmerized, I watch as something new manifests itself on the canvas before my bewildered eyes. The same happens in creative writing, when the words take over and I am amazed.

    But it is the art of music that represents a plane of consciousness beyond form and epitomizes creativity at its most abstract and pure state. In its acoustical and physical manifestation, music is imbued with mathematics. Pythagoras (c. 582 B.C. - 497 B.C.) was considered an early "scientist" and was thought to be the originator of the theory of harmonics. Fascinated with numbers and their manifestations as chords, Pythagoras is supposed to have "cured" his ailing disciples by playing music. In ancient times, music was inseparable from science mainly because of its source, mathematics. Recent studies have shown that the music of Mozart strengthens the neural connections that underline mathematical thought. So, the ancients were on to something after all. The etymology of "mathematics" is from the Greek mathema, meaning what is learned. Perhaps this should convince us of music as a source of creativity outside of the visible but well within the norm of analysis?

    Digging into the consciousness, letting loose associations and the confines of sequential constraints and expressing an ah-ha moment or creative vision is not confined to the artist. Were it not for the free ranging of his imagination, Einstein could never have formulated his laws of relativity. It was in a dream, he said, that he "discovered" the basis of his insight into relativity. "Inspiration," he wrote, "is more important than knowledge." The free-roaming mind allows the scientist to "discover" things he surely would miss if he were locked into pure rationality.

    To summarize, "creativity" may be viewed in this new age of fiber optics and cyberspace as an oddity, half-feared and half-distrusted but surreptitiously peeking its head out, demanding attention. The sixth sense needs to be heeded. Perhaps that is the most important function, the goal of the artist, to "transport the mind in experience past the guardians—desire and fear—to the...rapture of seeing in a single hair 'a thousand golden lions' (Joseph Campbell). As Alfred North Whitehead concluded,

    "Nature is a structure of evolving processes. The reality is the process." And equally, understanding creativity is itself a "process." Answers are not required!

  • 14 Mar 2021 7:59 AM | Rick Lakin, Webmaster (Administrator)



    Hello Friends and Family,

    If you would like to be in on the Zoom portion of this FREE workshop please respond to this email with a YES. I will let you know if the class has been filled (so if interested let me know asap as it will fill). It's next Saturday, March 20 at 10 am. We are very excited to be hosting the one and only Keith Rosson who will be discussing Magical Realism.


    To learn more about Ketih: http://www.keithrosson.com/news/


    More about the event: https://fb.me/e/8NXGrfDh9


    SDWF sends love,

    Marni Freedman



  • 11 Mar 2021 7:42 AM | Rick Lakin, Webmaster (Administrator)

    by Sandra Yeaman, SDWEG Webmaster Emeritus

    This is the fifth in a series of posts to address common issues with my suggestions for how all writers can improve their manuscripts before turning them over to agents, editors, and the many other individuals involved in the process of turning a manuscript into a book.

    #5 REMOVING COMMAS FROM WHERE THEY DON’T BELONG AND INSERTING THEM WHERE THEY DO

    When sentences get long, writers fall victim to the temptation to put in a comma—or two—to give the reader a place to breathe. But sometimes that results in a comma separating the subject from its verb or the verb from its direct object. Often a comma inserted before a conjunction such as and simply breaks a compound predicate into one complete sentence and a phrase that can’t stand on its own.

    When editing someone else’s work, I remove unnecessary commas, leaving them in only when their use meets one of four criteria: commas in a series, commas with two or more adjectives, commas with conjunctions (but watch out for this one because it has some rules of its own), and commas in introductory or parenthetical phrases including nouns of address.


    The Chicago Manual of Style recommends use of the serial, or Oxford, comma. This is the comma that precedes the conjunction—usually and—that connects items listed in a series. Sometimes it is absolutely necessary to accurately convey meaning. See the example sentences below:

    EXAMPLE 1: THE PEOPLE WHO INFLUENCED MY LIFE CHOICES MOST WERE MY PARENTS, THE POPE AND MOTHER THERESA.
    EXAMPLE 2: THE PEOPLE WHO INFLUENCED MY LIFE CHOICES MOST WERE MY PARENTS, THE POPE, AND MOTHER THERESA.

    Because the serial comma is needed some of the time for clarity, I use it in all cases when I edit a manuscript.

    The most common case of commas needing to be deleted is connected to conjunctions. Commas are not needed before every instance of a conjunction (and, or, but, so, etc.). For example, commas before and in compound predicates such as the one below are unnecesary.

    MY DOCTOR ADVISED THAT I SHOULD REDUCE THE AMOUNT OF SUGAR I CONSUME AND GET MORE EXERCISE.

    That’s where I find the most unneeded commas. As important, commas are not needed after most uses of conjunctions either unless what follows is a parenthetical thought that could be left out without changing the meaning of the sentence..

    Read through this post to see if you can identify which of the four rules applies to each comma you find.

    Sandra YeamanSandra Yeaman retired from the US Department of State in 2007 after 23 years as a Foreign Service Officer. As a management officer, she served at US embassies in Qatar, Barbados, Moldova, the United Arab Emirates, Yemen, Madagascar, Zambia, and Eritrea. In addition, she served in consular positions in Germany and Barbados and previously taught English as a Foreign Language in Iran and Romania.

    She is familiar with Arabic, Farsi, German, Romanian, Russian, and Spanish. Her experiences overseas brought her in touch with underserved minorities and religious groups out of favor with the current government. These experiences provide her with a sensitivity in her writing and editing not easily attained by others.

    These changes in environment and cultures challenged her notion of what success is. What made it possible for her to thrive in the midst of the change is the solid foundation she received in her childhood years in northern Minnesota.

    Since retirement, Sandra has been writing her story and her journey from a young woman seeking adventure to a mature woman who found her mission. She hopes to complete her novel in 2021 and looks forward to gaining the expertise in the full range of pre-publication book preparation and marketing.

    Sandra's Website


  • 11 Mar 2021 6:55 AM | Rick Lakin, Webmaster (Administrator)

    • Tiro Association for Arts presents Tiro International Poetry Contest. 


      The participation includes 2 categories:

      A) Poems made by over 18 years old people.                           

      B)  Poems made by under 18 years old people.

    • ·          The maximum extension for both categories - 600 words and Poems will be accepted in Arabic, Spanish, English, French.
    • ·          End date for submission: 25 March 2021
    •  

    Submission form: 

    An email shall be sent to the following email: 

    tiro.festivals@gmail.com

    SUBJECT: TIRO INTERNATIONAL POETRY CONTEST

    Attach 2pdfs:

    1- Poem title and author information: name, age, nationality, email, phone number, address and a photograph, and a statement in which the author authorizes Tiro Association for Arts to use and reproduce the poem. 

    2-Poem title + the poem itself.

     

    AWARDS:

    *CATEGORY A:

    -3 awards of 400USD each.

    -A short-film on each awarded poem made by the association.

    *CATEGORY B:

    -3 awards of 100USD each.

    -A short-film on each awarded poem made by the association.  

     

    A CATALOGUE CONTAINING 10 FINAL POEMS FOR EACH CATEGORY WILL BE MADE ON PAPER, VIDEO AND ONLINE.

    Looking forward to your participation !

     

    Best Regards

    Tiro team


    -- 

    Lebanese National Theater Management


    Lebanese National Theater, 

    Rivoli Street, near the Court.


    Association Tel: 0096181870124


    Contact us:


    Website

    Facebook


  • 5 Mar 2021 7:33 AM | Rick Lakin, Webmaster (Administrator)

     

    Corey Lynn Fayman has completed the manuscript for a new novel, working title The Rip.

    It's an historical crime novel, the first in a planned trilogy that will follow several families growing up in La Jolla, CA in the 1950s - 1970s.

    He is looking for beta readers to give offer feedback. If you're interested, email Corey at clf@coreylynnfayman.com.

    The Rip

    Summer 1956. In the affluent seaside resort of La Jolla, California, a rookie cop's high principles are put to the test when his search for a stolen suitcase implicates the rich and famous guests of the Del Charro Hotel, including Raymond Chandler, J. Edgar Hoover, and Zsa Zsa Gabor.

      Lookout! CD Groovy tunes from San Diego's Finest 1958 - 1973  La Jolla Shores 1955 Just a sleepy seaside town in Southern California  Killer Motivation Free read. Contract killer meets multi-level marketer.

    Lookout! CD

    Groovy tunes from San Diego's Finest 1958 - 1973

    La Jolla Shores

    1955 Just a sleepy seaside town in Southern California

    Killer Motivation

    Free read. Contract killer meets multi-level marketer.


  • 25 Feb 2021 9:40 AM | Rick Lakin, Webmaster (Administrator)

    CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS FOR:

    The Guilded Pen, Tenth Edition, 2021

    “THE POWER OF TEN”

    The Guilded Pen―2021 will mark our 10th Year!

    What a milestone!!

    To celebrate this achievement, the 2021 Anthology will highlight the number “ten” in this year’s publication. All SDWEG members are invited to submit their short stories, poems, and essays for review and possible acceptance for publishing.

    HOW TO SUBMIT:

    The submission period will begin April 1, 2021. Last day to submit is May 31, 2021.

    Email submissions to: anthology@sdwritersguild.org

    (Note: ONLY email submissions will be considered.)

    SUBMISSION GUIDELINES:      

    1. The submission must contain the word ten or the number 10 in the first sentence. There will be no exceptions.

    1.1 Some examples of using “ten” in the first sentence (Please do not use any of these examples):

    • Ten books were stacked on the desk when . . .
    • The clock struck “ten” as the shot rang out . . .
    • Maud and Harry were looking forward to their tenth anniversary—that was before Ted showed up and said . . .
    • If you half-heartedly divide 20 by 10, does the result completely measure up?

    Note: If the word Ten or the number “10” is omitted from the first sentence, the submission will not be read and will be returned to the author without further review. The author may choose to correct the oversight and resubmit.

    2. Up to 3 submissions may be entered; however, the aggregate word count may not exceed 4500 in total;

    3. Submissions must be:

    3.1 Double-spaced,

    3.2 Times New Roman, 12-point font,

    3.3 1-inch margins on all sides, and

    3.4 A word document with .doc or .docx

    4. No headers or footers, no page numeration, author’s name cannot be shown on any of the pages submitted.

    5. The entry must be edited for spelling, punctuation, verb tense and other grammar issues prior to submission. The author understands that further copyediting may take place after submission is accepted.

    If you find you need help with any of the technical aspects of the guidelines or with finding a good person to look over your piece before submitting it, remember that you are member of a group of dedicated writers and editors. Contact a fellow guild member for assistance. If you are unsure who to ask and you have checked the website, PLEASE contact someone on the Board of Directors and they will be more than happy to offer names of prospective writers and/or editors for you to contact.

    We hope you will step up to the challenge and submit your short stories, essays, and poetry to this year’s anthology. On a personal note, it’s a great way to add to those publishing credits; and, as our major fundraiser, your contribution will help support the mission of the SDWEG which is: To Support the Writing Arts for Youth and Adults.

    So, get writing!

    Marcia Buompensiero and Rivkah Sleeth

    Managing Editors


  • 24 Feb 2021 12:22 PM | Rick Lakin, Webmaster (Administrator)

     

    If Chevy Chase had played Indiana Jones, he would be Penn Wallace. Penn has a thirst for adventure, but nothing ever seems to go exactly as planned.

    In the spring of 2010 he lost the love of his life, his wife Connie, to Ovarian cancer. Ten years of living with cancer changed Penn's priorities. He learned that you can't live for tomorrow. You must live your dreams today, you never know if tomorrow will come.

    To this end, he set sail in the summer of 2012 for for the warm blue waters of Baja California in his 56-foot sailboat, the Victory.

    Penn is a confirmed dog curmudgeon. By a strange twist of fate, he lives on his boat with a one hundred seventy-pound Great Dane, Odin, and his owner, Dawn. You may read about his adventures and living on a boat with a giant dog on Penn's blog at www.pennwallace.com.

    He currently lives on the Victory in San Diego, but you never know where he will drop anchor next.

    As always, he's working on the next book.

    The Panama Murders: Catrina Flaherty Mysteries Book 4 (The Catrina Flaherty Mysteries) $0.99 NEW RELEASE!

    Amazon US | Amazon CA | Amazon UK | Amazon AU | Amazon IN

    Based on a true story.

    People on a remote Panamanian island are disappearing, and the local police are incompetent.
    Who you gonna call?

    Cat Flaherty.

    When the love Seattle PI Catrina Flaherty’s life turns out to be a serial killer, she turns him over to the police and walks away from her business, home, and friends. She slinks off to Panama to recover from her broken heart.

    Staying with Suzanne, a friend from the police academy, she meets colorful characters and observes the sometimes bizarre lifestyle of the ex-pats. She is enchanted by the beauty and the wildlife, but when people start dying, it’s obviously the work of a serial killer. Cat is sucked back into her role as an investigator and the killer soon has her in his sights.

    Can Cat discover the identity from a host of persons of interest before he gets her?

     

    Mirror Image: A Catrina Flaherty Mystery (Catrina Flaherty Mysteries Book 1)Mirror Image: A Catrina Flaherty Mystery (Catrina Flaherty Mysteries Book 1) $0.99

    Amazon US | Amazon CA | Amazon UK | Amazon AU | Amazon IN
    Female PI Catrina Flaherty tackles one of her most difficult cases. Cat specializes in women’s issues, infidelity, messy divorces, spousal abuse, sexual harassment, etc. But her newest client, Mandy Alcott, has an unusual problem; her abusive husband is the chief of police.

    What do you do when your abuser is The Law?

    You call Cat Flaherty.

    Cat sees in Mandy the same terror she herself endured at the hands of her police officer ex-husband. Can Cat save Mandy from her life of fear? Can she extricate Mandy and her two children safely?

    Murder Strikes Twice: A Catrina Flaherty Mystery, Book 2 (The Catrina Flaherty Mysteries)Murder Strikes Twice: A Catrina Flaherty Mystery, Book 2 (The Catrina Flaherty Mysteries) $0.99

    Amazon US | Amazon CA | Amazon UK | Amazon AU | Amazon IN
    One man; two dead wives.

    The police have ruled both cases accidents, but something doesn’t feel right.

    Who you gonna call?

    Cat Flaherty.

    Cat and her team scour Seattle for clues as the pieces start falling into place, but can she make a case that the D.A. will take to court? Can she bring the killer to justice before he finds her?

    Did Murder Strike Twice or will Brody Barrett get away with killing both of his wives?

    Catrina is known for administering vigilante justice. Will Brody finally have to pay for his sins?

    Solve the mystery along with Cat today!


    The Chinatown Murders: Catrina Flaherty Mysteries book 3 (The Catrina Flaherty Mysteries)The Chinatown Murders: Catrina Flaherty Mysteries book 3 (The Catrina Flaherty Mysteries) $0.99

    Amazon US | Amazon CA | Amazon UK | Amazon AU | Amazon IN
    WARNING: This book contains graphic sexual violence. Not intended for younger readers.

    Based on a true story.

    Someone is raping women working at massage parlors in Seattle's China Town. He selects his victims because they are undocumented aliens. They can’t go to the police or they risk deportation.

    Now he has escalated to murder.

    Who you gonna call?

    Cat Flaherty.

    The Man leads Catrina on a danger-fraught chase through the ancient streets of Chinatown in a race against time. Neither Catrina, nor her ex-lover, Detective Sergeant Tom Brennen, can stop the monster as the body count piles up.

    With a shock ending that you’ll never predict, the latest Cartrina Flaherty Mystery is a page burner.

    5 out of 5 stars

    "Another great read from Pendelton C. Wallace. I find myself wishing there another book to read about these characters as soon as I finish. If you are looking for entertaining fast paced actions this is the author for you. If you haven't read any of his work, good for you, as you can keep on going until you've read them all."

    5 out of 5 stars
    I love Cat as a special human whom I can relate ...

    "This book is so fast paced, just up my alley. I love Cat as a special human whom I can relate to.....Some of the characters are so politically incorrect that one can't help but smile. The plots are interesting and relevant and eye opening. Don't read if you are put off by explicit sex. Read if you can appreciate a great story line."


  • 22 Feb 2021 8:14 AM | Rick Lakin, Webmaster (Administrator)


    If you have already published a book, have you joined Hometown Reads—San Diego? At least ten current Guild members have.

    Why join Hometown Reads? Check out their About page.

    We’re a community dedicated to serving local authors across the country, by helping them connect with readers in their hometown through what we call the Read Local movement. Our site is the first of its kind to organize authors by local community, a design that is intended to facilitate both networking for authors and exposure/connection to more readers.

    It's free for both authors and readers to join. Authors get an author webpage where information about both author and their works are included. For an author without a website, this is a big plus. Readers can sign up to receive updates.

    The most recent update included information about Hometown Reads weekly Book Marketing Action Podcasts with Founder, Becky Robinson. Sign up to receive new episodes every Tuesday.

    Hometown Reads is also looking for stories about how you are handling book launches during this year, especially if you have information about how the pandemic has altered your book launch plans.



Copyright 2021 San Diego Writers and Editors Guild

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software